Mass Layoff Events up Jan. 2010


March 03, 2010 

Mass Layoff Events up in January

 2010

From the Editors Desk. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employers took 1,761 mass layoff actions in January that resulted in the separation of 182,261 workers, seasonally adjusted, as measured by new filing for unemployment insurance benefits during the month. Mass  layoff events and initial claimants for unemployment insurance, January  2007–January 2010, seasonally adjusted [Chart data] Both mass layoff events and initial claims increased from the prior month after four consecutive over-the-month decreases. During the 26 months from December 2007 through January 2010,the total number of mass layoff events (seasonally adjusted) was 53,739,and the associated number of initial claims was 5,425,101. http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2010/ted_20100303.htm

Economic News Release Economic News Release-Mass Layoffs
USDL-10-0229 (monthly report)

MASS LAYOFFS -- JANUARY 2010

Employers took 1,761 mass layoff actions in January
that resulted in the separation of 182,261 workers,

seasonally adjusted, as measured by new filings for
unemployment insurance benefits during the month,

the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.

Each action involved at least 50 persons from a

single employer. Both mass layoff events and initial

claims increased from the prior month after four

consecutive over-the-month decreases. In January,

486 mass layoff events were reported in the manufacturing

sector, seasonally adjusted,resulting in 62,556 initial claims.

Both figures increased over the month--thefirst increases

since August 2009 for events and since September 2009

for initial claims. (See table 1.)

During the 26 months from December 2007 through January 2010,

the total number of mass layoff events (seasonally adjusted) was

53,739, and the associated number of initial claims

was 5,425,101.
(December 2007 was the start of a recession as designated by the

National Bureau of Economic Research.)

The national unemployment rate was 9.7 percent in January 2010,

seasonally adjusted, down from 10.0 percent the prior month but

up from 7.7 percent a year earlier. In January, nonfarm payroll

employment decreased by 20,000 over the month and by 4,022,000

from a year earlier.Industry Distribution (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

The number of mass layoff events in January was 2,860 on a not

seasonally adjusted basis; the number of associated initial claims

was 278,679. Over the year, the number of mass layoff events

decreased by 946, and associated initial claims decreased

by 110,134. (See table 2.)

Sixteen of the 19 major industry sectors in the private economy

reported over-the-year decreases in initial claimants, led by

manufacturing (-67,911). (See table 3.) Management of companies

and educational services reported January program highs in terms

of average weekly initial claimants while utilities reached a

January program low. (Average weekly analysis mitigates the effect

of differing lengths of months. See the Technical Note.)

The manufacturing sector accounted for 34 percent of all mass

layoff events and 38 percent of initial claims filed in

January 2010. A year earlier, manufacturing made up

38 percent of events and 44 percent of initial claims.

Within manufacturing, the number of claimants in January

was greatest in transportation equipment, followed by food,

fabricated metal products, and machinery.
Eighteen of the 21 manufacturing subsectors experienced

over-the-year decreases in initial claims, led by

transportation equipment (-34,023). (See table 3.)

The six-digit industry with the largest number of initial

claims in January 2010 was temporary help services.
Of the 10 detailed industries with the largest number of
mass layoff initial claims,school and employee bus

transportation, discount department stores, and

nonresidential electrical contractors reached program

highs forthe month of January.

(See table A.)
Table A. Industries with the largest number of mass layoff

initial claims in January 2010, not seasonally adjusted

January peak
Industry Initial Initial

claims Year claims
Temporary help services (1) .. 16,575 1998 26,224
School and employee bus

transportation ......... 15,131 2010 15,131
Discount department stores . 8,065 2010 8,065
Motion picture and video

production ............ 7,966 1998 12,038
Professional employer

organizations (1) ........ 6,462 2009 11,345
Highway, street, and bridge

construction ....... 5,094 2000 9,680
Hotels and motels, except casino

hotels ........ 4,248 2009 6,592
Automobile manufacturing ...... 4,173 2001 21,093
Supermarkets and other

grocery stores .......... 3,371 2009 3,978
Nonresidential electrical

contractors .......... 3,299 2010 3,299

1 See the Technical Note for more information on these industries.

Geographic Distribution (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

All regions and all divisions experienced over-the-year decreases
in initial claims due to mass layoffs in January. Among the 4 census
regions, the South (-41,525) and Midwest (-31,010) registered the
largest over-the-year decreases in initial claims. Of the 9

geographic divisions, the East North Central(-30,146) and the

South Atlantic (-21,046) had the largest over-the-year decreases

of initial claims.

(See table 5.)
California recorded the highest number of initial claims in January,

followed by New York and Pennsylvania. Forty states experienced

over-the-year decreases in initial claims, led by Ohio (-13,850),

Pennsylvania (-13,226), and Michigan (-10,418). (See table 6.)

In 2010, three states reached January program highs for average

weekly initial claims: North Dakota, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin.

Note

The monthly data series in this release cover mass layoffs of 50or more workers beginning in a given month, regardless of the

duration of the layoffs.For private nonfarm establishments,

information on the length of the layoff is obtained later and

issued in a quarterly release that reports on mass layoffs

lasting more than 30 days (referred to as "extended mass layoffs").

The quarterly release provides more information on the industry

classification and location of the establishment and on the

demographics of the laid-off workers.

Because monthly figures include short-term layoffs of

30 days or less, the sum of the figures for the 3 months in

quarter will be higher than the quarterly figure for mass

layoffs of more than 30 days.

(See table 4.)

See the Technical Note for more detailed definitions.

____________
The Mass Layoffs in February 2010 news release is scheduled to be
released on
Tuesday, March 23, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. (EDT).

Technical information:  (202) 691-6392  *  mlsinfo@bls.gov  *
www.bls.gov/mls
Media contact:          (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/mmls_02232010.htm

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Posted on 2010/03/04, in From The Editors, The World Today and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

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  1. Pingback: Unemployment Wisconsin Weekly Claim

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